Beware Of An Acidic Diet

Moore tooth strengthening Most men and women don’t think of a tooth as a body part that wavers in strength. Our teeth seem to have a steady hardness and dependably grind food whenever we need them. However, teeth are dynamic organisms with continual chemical processes.

The protective enamel that covers the softer interior consists of minerals. Enamel demineralizes (loses some of its density) when it comes in contact with acids.

Saliva can dilute and neutralize acid so the tooth can re-harden This process isn’t instantaneous, however.

While the enamel is soft, the tooth is susceptible to losing a microscopic outer layer of enamel. If the erosion continues, the much softer dentin is exposed. The dentin erodes more quickly. Eventually, the tooth may need to be extracted.

It is apparent that the ordinary diet is becoming more acidic. The list of acidic foods may surprise you. They include eggs, gravy, asparagus, chicken, cottage cheese, honey, fish, ham, butter, sour cream, aged cheese, and yogurt with active cultures. Generally, foods with a high sugar or artificial sweetener content are considered acidic. We don’t recommend eliminating the healthy foods on this list. However, we just want you to be aware of the issue.

Now let’s talk about beverages. You probably already know that soda pop and wine are not good for your teeth. Teens that sip soda all day can have acid erosion while their young teeth should be at their densest. In addition to soda, energy drinks are very popular and dentists are noticing the effects.

If you drink soda or energy drinks often, you may want to drink water or chew sugarless gum after downing a can. Increasing saliva production can trigger the remineralization process.

If your teeth have become more sensitive in general, or in response to hot or cold foods or drinks, you may have acid erosion. To schedule an examination with Mark Phan at OKC Smiles, call 405-634-7303 today.

We are located at 930 SW 107th St in Oklahoma City. We hope you have benefited from this message and look forward to your visit.

Contact OKC Smiles:

405-634-7303

Location (Tap to open in Google Maps):

930 SW 107th St
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
73170

 

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